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Thread: would you camp in a coire/corrie

  1. #1
    Initiate ecco's Avatar
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    I'm planning to camp in a couple of well known scottish coires in a couple of weeks time.

    Online photos show lovely images of these rock strewn corries which made me wonder how safe from rockfall it is to camp in these places.

    Ok, some of those rocks have been there 1000 years or so, but why temp fate. Level pitches are in short supply in these places and the options might be only to camp near crags & poss rockfalls or not.

    What would you do ?

  2. #2
    Initiate julian b's Avatar
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    Id camp but then again ive been flooded in the sahara and had my tent damaged by a cocunut in Ghana so ignore me.

  3. #3
    ‹bermensch Evil Genius Darren's Avatar
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    Remember to check what the 'rules' for wild camping in Scotland are.

  4. #4
    ‹bermensch Chris Townsend's Avatar
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    The "rule" for wild camping in Scotland is that it's a legal right. The only rule is not to camp next to inhabited buildings.

    I've camped in hundreds of corries over the years. The chances of being caught in a rockfall are very, very low.

  5. #5
    ‹bermensch druidh's Avatar
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    While it is true that many of the corries see regular rock-fall, this tends to peak in the spring due to the effects of frost/thaw cycles. Outwith this time, you're probably just as likely to have your house fall down around you while in bed at home.

    On a more general point, I'm amazed at the perceived risk which many outdoor enthuiasts see from fairly innocuous activities. I reckon that the most dangerous bit is getting to/from the gig on our roads!

  6. #6
    Initiate ecco's Avatar
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    Thanks to everyone for their comments - corries here I come !

    Colin - point taken about perceived risks but risk also needs to be considered from the point of view of what is avoidable and what is not. Getting to & from a gig is unavoidable with the attendant risk, whereas camping in a coire is entirely avoidable should advice dictate.

  7. #7
    Initiate
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    Most corries are pretty big, if a rock fall were to be big enough to hit all the coirre it'd have to be half the hill. Just be sensible think about where about you're putting your tent, is it right under a cliff or away from it a bit and next to a lovely lochan just tempting you in a for a swim...
    Only time I've see evidence of a big rockfall is on Skye..

  8. #8
    ‹bermensch philip newing's Avatar
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    Risk is a function of perception. Discuss.

  9. #9
    ‹bermensch Chris OutdoorsGrubcouk's Avatar
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    You've usually got your work cut out finding enough space that's level and not bog, so my rule is if some appears then get your tent on it pronto!

  10. #10
    Ultra King MoS's Avatar
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    My risk strategy is:-

    Identify the risk - What are the potential dangers?

    Assess the risk - What is the worst that could happen?

    Minimise the risk - What can I do to improve my chances of staying safe?

    Manage the risk - How will I put my plan into action?

    Monitor the situation - Stay aware incase things change.

    I used this at work but I think its a useful check list for all sorts of situations.

    I guess you are right Philip, risk is a function of perception, based on an individuals assessment of the situation. At the minimise the risk stage, one person may decide that a risk is worth taking, another might not. It depends on how one perceives the environment, the conditions and ones own experience and ability to cope with it.

    Enjoy your trip ecco


  11. #11
    Mini Goon
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    Elaine - suggest you stay in bed - assuming there is minimal suffocation risk.

  12. #12
    Ultra King MoS's Avatar
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    [Unknown, 25 March 1993] A Vapid Death A terrible diet and room with no ventilation are being blamed for the death of a man who was killed by his own gas. There was no mark on his body but autopsy showed large amounts of methane gas in his system. His diet had consisted primarily of beans and cabbage (and a couple other things). It was just the right combination of foods. It appears that the man died in his sleep from breathing from the poisonous cloud that was hanging over his bed. Had he been outside or had his windows opened it wouldn't have been fatal but the man was shut up in is near airtight bedroom. He was "...a big man with a huge capacity for creating [this deadly gas]." Three of the rescue workers got sick and one was hospitalized.

  13. #13
    Initiate julian b's Avatar
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    The mind boggles!err it is may 1 not apr...

  14. #14
    ‹bermensch druidh's Avatar
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    Certainly emphasises the need for good ventilation in tents, makes me worry about bivis tho

  15. #15
    Ultra King MoS's Avatar
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    Yeh, a vapid death does sound a bit far fetched, but one less thing to worry about if camping in a corrie:-)

    Peter, I was trying to make a serious point. My risk strategy may sound over the top, but if you think about it we face risks many times every day. The thought process I outlined probably takes a fraction of a second in most situations - making decisions when driving a car for instance. It's only when things get complicated that its sometimes useful to take some time to analyse things in more detail.


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