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Thread: Bags for carrying several days' food in

  1. #1
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    I tend to use Tesco or Sainsburys bags, finding the handles tie well together, keeping things dry, and are easy to peer into, to find the missing garlic etc. But they are pretty poor nowadays, falling apart at the slightest thing. So whatdo others use? Might Waitrose ones be superior, perhaps??

  2. #2
    ‹bermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
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    I do shop in Waitrose quite a bit - purely as it is my nearest food store of any worth - but I would not say especiallythat their bags are superior to any other supermarkets ones really there Rob. Maybe try one out, and do try Aldi bags too if you like. I take it we are talking of the 50p type bigger handled so called 'bags for life' shopper variety, yes?

    Trevor DC Gamble

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    Thanks - just the throwaway ones, being lightest.

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    ‹bermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
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    ok! Most of these now seem to be biodegradable as I am using them to carry my shopping home in! The Waitrose ones definitely are not really much better. The Sainsburys ones and the newer Tesco ones though do indeed seem to be a fair deal tougher than the average in my experience. The toughest ones definitely for you to use outdoors walking are the bigger free red and white Iceland ones, that win hands down in my own humble opinion, ok!

    Millets bags though are actually what I use for this! They're made of a thicker plastic! So much tougher! They are free, but obviously you have to find something from out of their basic ranges that you actually really want to buy, in order to get the free bag! Not always easy I find! The gel fuel packs are good in there however I think. They also sell Light My Fire products that I am especially fond of. There is a sale on in there at the moment, which I find helps tempt me in every now and again.
    Trevor DC Gamble

  5. #5
    ‹bermensch The Tallest of Paul's's Avatar
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    i use coops 10p a pop green bags. last a good while and if you want to when there fecked take them back and get another free.

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    I use stuff sack, smaller one for snacks.

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    Thanks all. Will do some investigating... I wondered about Alpkit's stuff bags but not such a good shape - and heavier. Tougher tho. Might take a trip to Iceland (shop, sadly).

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    ‹bermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
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    I tried yesterday on Alpkit website to find the stuff sacs to print a link here, but could not find them on their rather confusing website anymore, strangely.
    Trevor DC Gamble

  9. #9
    ‹bermensch Taz's Avatar
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    clothes shops do decent bags and you can buy better bags for 6 p or such in supermarkets.

    Cheap karrimor stuff sacks from Sportsdirect.

  10. #10
    Goon
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    I just use various plastic carrier bags, and change them as they get worn out

    Hamish Brown states that he used a string bag on his long Munro trip, in 1974 Ithink. Don't know if you can still get them.

  11. #11
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    Thanks all. The old, simple Tesco/Sainsburys type bags were good, adequately strong, free, disposable etc - and light. The long-term re-usables are a different beast, heavier than I wanted, albeit not that much. But they don't have the convenient tie handles. I think a string bag would not so the same job in keeping thefood dry...

    I can't see stuff sacs on SD website, only drybags, and I have plenty of them, Alpkits, mostly, and quite a few of their stuff sacs. Might end up using one ofthem, perhaps?

  12. #12
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    Freezer bags with tie handles?

  13. #13
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    Hello Rob,

    Just back in from Canada where we used 3x medium sized (32x50cm) Loksak food storage bags to carry up to 11 days food for 2 people. They look like beefed up freezer bags but they do the job of keeping food completely dry (and they do block food smells to deter wildlife). I can highly recommend them based on the last two summer trips in the Rockies. They seem to be relatively durable as well.

    Available here

    http://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co....bags-3pk-p2191

    and here

    http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/co...ies/LB126.html








  14. #14
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    Mike, I think the freezer bags would be too small, and maybe not tough enough?

    Dave, these look useful, and especially ifcontaining food smells is advisable. I may well get some, for this and other purposes. I use their other sizes too, but hadn't realised they came this large.

    I picked up somedecent carrier bags from our local and excellent army surplus place in Exeter, Endicotts, during the week. Seem quite tough, a good size, weigh 11 gm - and no ventilation holes! They may be the answer...

    Thanks again.

  15. #15
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    Cut down a garden refuge sack

  16. #16
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    dog turd bags

  17. #17
    Mini Goon
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    How about an onya bag? - Far more environmentally friendly than plastic.

    http://www.onyabags.co.uk/products/bags-backpacks

  18. #18
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    Hi Rob,
    How about the small swing bin bags, there are probably different quality ones about

  19. #19
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    Hi all, many thanks for the above suggestions, much appreciated. I think I'm going to run with the carrier bags from Endicotts, Exeter now, cheap, fairly strong and light. We'll see how they go! The onya bags look interesting, too. Not long now...

  20. #20
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    To answer my own question, if of use to anyone: I used carrier bags from the brilliant Endicotts in the end, but sadly only for about 10 days total, family matters forcing an early return. Anyway, the bags were fantastic, easily holding up to everything I asked of them. Much, much better than anything else I have tried.

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