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Thread: Why do my thermos flasks have such a short life?

  1. #21
    Initiate Nick P 10's Avatar
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    I think you can forgive the bottle that fell 150 ft, Guy

    I will have a look at those Ultimate ones.

  2. #22
    ‹bermensch
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    Or you could 'man up' and drink water with bits of ice forming in it.

    It certainly stops you gulping it down.



    PS I only drink water on the hill because I hate coffee, and tea in a thermos flask tastes nearly as bad as coffee.

  3. #23
    ‹bermensch
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    Most flasks are nowadays as they say"" thermos ie.just an insulation of sorts. The price depends on the quality of the insulation. If you want the best heat retention make sure it says vacumn on the flask somewhere ,not just thermos flask.

    Cheers.

  4. #24
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    FWIW, I have just bought one of the Thermos flasks recommended above. It's 205 gm lighter than my Lifeventure 700, even tho it's 100 ml bigger. I have compared theirefficiencies having filled them both with boiling water, without pre-heating. After 6 hours, theLV was 80 c, the T was 87. After 9 hours, 72 & 81 and after12 hours, 66 & 77. So the new one is bigger, lighter and more efficient.(And more expensive!)

    How robust have people found them?

  5. #25
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    I've had 7 in the last 8 years. The oldest has a double wall mirror glass inner flask and it outperforms, and always has, all the others with SS or plastic inner flasks. I've ditched all the others.


  6. #26
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    Interesting! Have you had on of these Thermos ones tho? I am pretty impressed so far - even 30 hours after filling, it was still too hot to put a finger in.

  7. #27
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    Mostly Thermos or Stanley, usually with those push button pour stoppers. All mine have eventually leaked. The only one that hasn't is my original type Thermos with the bog standard stopper. It's still good for 8 to 9 hours.


  8. #28
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    IME There are Thermos flasks and then there are Thermos Ultimate flasks. The former tend to be no better or worse than most other flasks, but the latter perform better and seem to me to last longer, too. Their longevity is helped by the fact they have plain stoppers, not the complex, fragile and difficult to clean push button type. The 500ml version I have has been in use every week or so for at least four years and is still going strong.

  9. #29
    Ultra King Diddi's Avatar
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    Fill flask with boiling water prior to making flask to heat it up.
    Make contents of flask in a microwavable container heat for a couple of minutes after making flask.
    Empty water from flask, fill with brew stuff.
    Helps keep warmer longer.

  10. #30
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    Good to hear, Guy. Diddi - for most instances, pre-boiling doesn't matter to me but on my winter days in the hills, I boil up exactly the right amount per flask then decant half into the flask while I add instantchoc powder to the billy, while the stove simmers. Mix it in, tip back the flask contents, boil and pour. Works well for me and minimises fuel use.

  11. #31
    ‹bermensch Snowdon Ranger's Avatar
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    Tried lots of different flasks over the years- even the Zojirushi's which many people rave about.Think that a lot of the hype over these may have been due to a picture of Alan Hinkes using one.

    Have to agree that the Thermos Ultimate is the very best.

  12. #32
    Ultra King Matt C's Avatar
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    Alan who?

    Seriously though, Zojirushi have been around since well before Mr Hinkes achieved any real level of media prominence.

    I bought two back in 1998 and they're both still going strong and keeping my drinks hot for hours. I bought a Thermos Ultimate to try too when they got some rave notices on here, but tbh I don't rate it any better than the Zojirushis and I prefer their design.

  13. #33
    ‹bermensch Snowdon Ranger's Avatar
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    No problem-you like the Zojirushis and I much prefer the Thermos Ultimates.

    Would be a boring old World if we all had the same opinions.

  14. #34
    Widdler
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    I have a coleman one, had it 20 years now, its more dented than straight but still keeps water hot for 24hrs

  15. #35
    Mini Goon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowdon Ranger View Post

    Tried lots of different flasks over the years- even the Zojirushi's which many people rave about.Think that a lot of the hype over these may have been due to a picture of Alan Hinkes using one.
    I'm guessing, when you posted this you had something stronger than coffee in your flas...sorry Thermos.

  16. #36
    Initiate Toot's Avatar
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    Couple of tips I was given by a hiking chef years ago...

    This chap told me to take apart the push-to-pour stopper from my vacuum-flask, to see what was inside. The flask had been filled with tea/sugar/milk that morning, which had been partially consumed during the day. Unscrewing the parts, I can only describe the sludge that coated them inside as "discouraging". There was a light brown surface slime already starting to smell like sour milk, and that itself seemed to be sticking to older congealed stuff in places. Yuk.

    The chef, admittedly a bit of a hygiene freak, reckoned he knew this as common with all similar push-and-pour stoppers used with anything but water. The first pouring coats the internal stopper parts with the liquid mixture which then sits there until the flask is used again later, and in the meantime any milk product starts to turn sour with the encouragement of the warmth from the remaining liquid below. That slime will stick to the parts, eventually going hard when it has air-dried, which is what happens if a vacuum-flask of this sort is used to store anything but water and isn't afterwards cleaned promptly and thoroughly. The dried gunk isn't easy to remove except by very careful cleaning - that usually means taking a push-to-pour stopper apart just to make sure the internal bits have been cleaned properly. And we all do that of course...

    Fail to clean a push-to-pour stopper properly, and the gunge remaining inside it will wait to be washed into your next hot drink... I know this because when I got home, I took the push-to-pour stoppers from my other flasks apart to find that even pouring hot water from a kettle through them (the cleaning method I used at that time), had not made them completely clean from previous use. Why not check your own now...?

    Since that time I have followed my chums advice and A) only used vacuum-flasks with simple threaded bung-type stoppers (ie; ones with no liquid flow through internal parts of the stopper), and B) only used my vacuum-flask for hot water containment, and certainly not for any milk product. In both cases, it seems to me that the contents start off at a greater heat and stay hotter for a longer time - and it's probably a far more hygienic and therefore healthy system too.

  17. #37
    Ultra King Parky Again's Avatar
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    Only a problem, like anything else, if you can't be arsed to clean and look after your kit properly.

    such simple cleaning, and lets face it idiot hygiene like washing your hands, flows into everyday life and serves anyone right if they can't be bothered.



    bicarbonate of soda is an excellent cleaning product.

  18. #38
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    Bicarb isn't great on aluminium or steel as it chemically attacks both of those metals.

    Works best with friction and I think access to the moving bits will be why they collect debris in valves.

    What about drain cleaner

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