Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Walking Poles

  1. #1
    Mini Goon Andy P 25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    229


    Been looking at these Walking Poles £9.99 from TKMaxx . They are not to be used every week, more like once a month. Have read they are really good value for money. Has anyone got/used them and are they OK? At that price I suppose I can't go wrong for the ammount of outings they'll get.

    http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/trigger-lock-pole-p151625

    Cheers

    Andy

  2. #2
    Ultra King Peter Clinch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,252


    Walking poles are, when it comes down to it, sticks. Rocket science need not be involved to do sticks reasonably well, so I think your assessment of not being able to go too far wrong is about on the money.

    Clicky for some tips on use.

    Pete.

  3. #3
    Mini Goon mattb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    204


    Hi Andy,

    Myself and my wife were in Go Outdoors couple of weeks ago looking for some poles. We had originally wanted either the Leki speedlocks or BD flicklocks but came across the Trekmates trigger locks for £14.99. Too good to be true? Well they had 4 poles on display and upon first inspection they felt so so light compared to others, however the squidgy foam handle wouldn't last 5 minutes as it is very thin, plus once we had extended the pole it would bend at the bottom section and collapse when we put a little pressure on it. This happened on all 4 poles unfortunately. The trigger assembly is very thin plastic with a tiny screw that holds it all together and this is the reason for it collapsing as it simply isnt strong enough. We ended up going over to foothills and buying the Leki Khumbu's and im glad we did as they just wont collapse no matter how much pressure we put on them.

    As a note, we were in TK max the other day and the Trekmates were in there for £9.99 each and i had another look at the pole.
    It was very hard to make it collapse this time but thats because the Screw was tightened up so much it was hard to extend the lower section. I'd say they may be a good starter pole if you dont rely on them for pulling yourself up and over rocks etc and dontmind the foam grip and bendy bottom section.

  4. #4
    Mini Goon Andy P 25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    229


    Thanks for the replies. Haven't tried them out in anger yet as they are for the wife, hence only getting an airing now and again due to shift work. They won't be used in too difficult conditions so hopefully they should be fine.

    Cheers

  5. #5
    Mini Goon Simon Parker 2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    81


    well, related to walking poles in general.. I found a pair of walking poles on top of scafell pike.. Having never used poles before I was amazed how useful they were in propelling myself up the side of Great Gable ! I started to get a bit over confident with them on my descent and started using them to hold my full weight in various compromising positions. These ones are branded as Highlander and seem pretty sturdy. Not sure why any one would have left them on a mountain though ?

    I just checked on ebay and you can get these for £16 a pair delivered.. search for Highlander Jura. At that price I think I could recomend them !

  6. #6
    Ultra King NickNick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    5,944
    I suspect they were forgotten rather than left on purpose....

  7. #7
    Widdler MikeJohnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    5
    This is a very helpful discussion - thanks to everyone who contributed. I am looking at a longish walk in the Spring and have never used poles but my knees are getting that sickening crunching sound with age/use and I am reliably informated that poles take literally tonnes of weight off your knees over the course of a hike. Poles are 'silly money' (i.e. cheap) on ebay and retail at about £24 from one of my favourite shops (sound advice following this link too for up and under) where they have never been known to sell rubbish - am still using a lot of kit I bought there 20 years ago. That's the dilemma... scrimp on ebay, go up-market online 'somewhere', or get 'good value' at my local shop

  8. #8
    Ultra King NickNick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    5,944


    Mike, a cheap pair of poles will tell you if they are the right thing for you, if you get on with using them.

    r If you do then splurge - of keep using the cheapies, you just don't have to spend much to find if they work for you.

  9. #9
    Widdler MikeJohnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    5
    Thanks Nick! Am quite a skinflint... but the 'buy cheap, buy twice' addage haunts me somewhat... and it's amazing how £10 here and £20 there adds up! I recon adding those amounts together (for when the first pair break and you decide to go up-market) would get you a robust pair of sticks. What you expect to pay for in a shop is clearly the service, and the ability to touch and feel, take apart, or even lean heavilly upon, before buying...

  10. #10
    Ultra King NickNick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    5,944


    Hi Mike,

    In my experience, a cheap pair of poles aren't likely to break, I took mine along the Pennine Way and in the High Atlas.

    They are heavier and have slightly less comfortable handles than more expensive ones but the technology is basically the same.

    I agree with you on the buy cheap, buy twice issue but if you want to try them out and don't get on with them (and not everyone does) then a cheap pair is the way to go in my opinion.

    I was sceptical about poles for years and always carry a pair now, I don't always use them but appreciate them when I feel the need.

  11. #11
    Widdler
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    47


    Hi Mike , I have done a lot of winter walking in the lakes over the years and I have been in and out of love with walking poles for a long time. The argument I have had with myself against them is that I felt they altered any natural balance I may have, that my arms and shoulders were quite tense while walking, and that I had to think about 4 points of contact on the ground instead of 2 which I found tricky on descents. My argument for them is that they were really useful whenI have had to scare off dogs, cows and a fox which gave me a funny look once.

    I must be honest although I am 59 I do not suffer much with my knees ( touch wood) but I suffer with calf muscles that get easily tired,consequentallyI have concentrated on researching what I could do about this particular problem. I came across a book called chi walking and it has changed my walking life. It reinforced my views on balance but took it a whole lot further as regards walking teqhnique. I guess what I am trying to say, grasshopper, is look at your walking style and maybe buy 1 walking pole for any cantankerous foxes you may come across.

  12. #12
    Ultra King
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    6,147


    I first got poles for dodgy knee issue but I strengthened the knees and legs in general at the gym so don't use them except as tarp poles and occasionally when backpacking if my load is heavier than normal or rough terrain when backpacking. They otherwise sit on my pack for use at night for the tarp. Must try to find something lighter for that.

    Anyway they are great for winter snow walks as yuo can descend very quickly with them.

    My trouble now actuakly precludes the use of then as I have dodgy elbows and if I use them for a whole walk I get sore, stiff and crunchy elbows. The knees are great but what can you do for dodgy elbows? can't get poles for them.

    BTW cheap is ok but be aware of the slipping twist locks you get with all poles that aren't flick lock. No problem but if you have a heavy pack and lean with your weight on them you get that sinking feeling. If you are aware then not a problem as it is more of a slow slipp down not a fast one so no reall issue to readjust it.

  13. #13
    ‹bermensch Moonlight Shadow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    3,794


    The most likely faith of your poles is to be forgotten somewhere so I'd advise to stick to cheap pairs, in most cases they'll do the job for long enough. I've had a number of very basic cheapo ones from GO and they lasted at least a year (before being forgotten in a bus or a pub...).

    A useful thing to buy, as cheapo pairs generally do not have a decent handles, is a a pair of basic fingerless bike gloves, the leathery type ones, prevents rubbing quite nicely.

  14. #14
    ‹bermensch
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,902
    I'd go for a decent set of poles with a flicklock or similar system -- Black Diamond and Leki both do versions of this. Poles with the screw locking systems sometimes work fine, but sometimes they don't, even the expensive ones, whereas flicklocks always seem to work for me.
    The Black Diamond Trail pole is a very well made model without any fancy (useless) features and doesn't cost the earth.

  15. #15
    Widdler
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    47


    Hi lost in Lancashire

    Sorry to hear about your elbows - you may have to start drinking halves instead of pints! Now you have got me wondering if using 2 poles is like walking on all fours!

  16. #16
    Guest


    I bought some walking poles for a kili trip, I bought a cheap pair for about a fiver (highlander?) and they were quite heavy, so i thought not to bother, but then tried some leki ones that were miles lighter so took them. The cheap / heavy pair are still in the attic, but I might take the leki to mont blanc for helping me across the snowy walking bits.... or I might not.

    My pair have shock absorbers on the bottom, and I'm not sure of the benefit of them, especially as the pole gives when you put weight on it, think I'd prefer them to be unshocked, and I don't mean the opposite of this

Similar Threads

  1. Walking Poles
    By FOX160 in forum Gear
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 08-03-2015, 07:10 AM
  2. Walking poles
    By hypan in forum Gear
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-09-2013, 08:53 PM
  3. Walking poles
    By jim turner in forum Gear
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-02-2012, 12:00 PM
  4. Walking poles?
    By fazini in forum Starting out?
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 05-03-2007, 08:15 PM
  5. Help I need Walking Poles
    By Paul Wilkins in forum Gear
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 27-04-2004, 08:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •