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Thread: Food/Nutrition on the hill

  1. #1
    Mini Goon mali's Avatar
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    Usually i only take a packed lunch/sweets etc, but ive always fancied a hot meal when out and about.

    The thought of squashed sarnies isnt really motivating me to stop and actually enjoy my lunch

    Im toying with the idea of buying a jetboil and taking boil in the bag food, is it wayfarer? anyone have any experience with these i.e are they tasty or absolute rank, and what about nutritional value, are they enough to keep you going?

    Does anyone else use one of these or eat these meals when on the hills, or is it a case of me being a wet lettuce and really i should just put up with the squashed sarnies

    Any other ideas welcome

    mali

  2. #2
    ‹bermensch RaR's Avatar
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    These meals are lightwieght, easy to prepare and don't involve washing up afterwards.

    I do not find any significant difference in taste between the dry meals and the Wayfarer.

    The dry meals are quicker to make too as you only need to boil water and pour it in rather than simmering it for 5 mins or so with boil-in-the-bag type foods.

    You can't beat sarnies for day walks though :-)

  3. #3
    Mini Goon mali's Avatar
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    Hey they look really good, cheap to, thanks Richard


  4. #4
    ‹bermensch RaR's Avatar
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    It works out at about £1.30 per meal - way cheaper than the £3.50 or so they go for in the Outdoor shops.

    I bought some the other day, took about 4 days to arrive.

    All are well within sell by date.

  5. #5
    Widdler Jon Whitley's Avatar
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    Yup, i bought some of these too.

    I'm saving them for a spot of wildcamping in August.

    I read some pretty bad reviews for them - but having given in to curiosity and tried one of the shepherds pies... i was pleasantly surprised! Not too bad, and very light.

    Mine are in date until November i think.

  6. #6
    ‹bermensch John Burley's Avatar
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    For tasty boil in the bag, try some of the readymade Indian meals available in most Asian food markets. Humorously, Gits is a pretty good brand, but there are many others and they usually sell for £1-2. Good for me as I don't eat meat. Slightly high in salt and fat, but this can be a good thing in the outdoors, to replenish lost electrolytes and give you long-lasting energy.

  7. #7
    ‹bermensch John Burley's Avatar
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    Oh... and whatever you choose, best to try it out at home before opening up a packet in a miserable downpour and discovering it's horrible!


  8. #8
    Ultra King Parky Again's Avatar
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    the jetboil is rather heavy. if you just want the odd hot meal go for a lightweight stove, a pan and make yourself a pot cosy.

  9. #9
    Mini Goon mali's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replys people

    Parky Again- would something like the MSR pocket rocket and Titanium kettle be more appropriate?
    I did look at that aswell, but liked the idea of the jetboil.

  10. #10
    Ultra King Kinley's Avatar
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    Are you talking day walks or multi-day - if day walks why not fill a 500ml flask with hot soup? By the time you've got the above stoves/fuel/ready made meals you'd be lighter.

    I make hot cross buns with peanut butter + banana. They dont squash and last a couple of days. Hi energy too and tasty.

  11. #11
    Mini Goon mali's Avatar
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    It would be for day walks as it stands...soup is not an option, i cant stomach it.

    The MSR combo seems like a really versatile piece of kit, and the thought of the waiting times sorting it out and cooking is a blessing in disguise, i get to have a longer break (not that fit)

    Thanks for your input all

    mali

  12. #12
    Just like to recommend the link above for the 10 raven meals for £13 inc postage, each one I've tried has been better than expected, much better value than travellunch.

  13. #13
    Ultra King Parky Again's Avatar
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    any light small stove with a 100 canister will do.
    as you're not doing it "seriously" (i hope that comes out alright!) it will be a good start.
    me, i use a titanium stove from podcast bob with a 100 gas cartridge, which will heat a lot of water, a titanium pan and a cosy. light small and effective.
    for even more savings i'm waiting to try out the meths stove for even more weight loss. it's light enough to carry both. oh, and of course a windshield.

  14. #14
    Mini Goon mali's Avatar
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    Haha your comment came out fine, im not a hardcore enthusiast just yet, but anything to make time spent more comfortable without taking the kitchen sink is beneficial.

    thanks again

  15. #15
    Ultra King Parky Again's Avatar
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    hurrah! a thread i can actully view.
    just thought i'd add stoves can be a bit unstable so for the gas cartridge:
    take one cable tie that will fit around the cartridge, or 2 joined together, and make a loop. on that loop add three further cable ties and make loops about 2-3cms in diameter. so you now have one big loop with 3 small loops hanging from it. put the big loop around the gas catridge and tighten. trim off any excess. use tent pegs (or nails/skewers/sticks etc) through as many of the 3 small loops as necessary to secure the cartridge to the ground. voila, one very stable stove. the big loop just slides off the cartridge for re-use.

  16. #16
    Mini Goon Bob Mahon's Avatar
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    "take one cable tie that will fit around the cartridge..."
    That's a good idea Parky - now why didn't I think of that!

  17. #17
    Widdler Elspeth's Avatar
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    another alternative to cable ties is a free standing stove....i.e. they stand away from the gas bottle/canister so none of those wobble issues. I have the Primus gravity which is excellent-very lightweight and small. hope we doesnt make the choice even harder.

  18. #18
    Mini Goon
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    Jet boils are far too heavy,use an MSR stove concentrate the heat round one of the new Ultralite Trangia pans with aluminium foil.
    Dont worry too much about nutritional value a few days of an illl balanced diet on the hill will not do you much harm.
    Much cheaper and it allows you to vary the flavour is Sosmix,just bring to the boil,let it stand while you make a white sauce mix with curry or chilly or oxo or cheese,mix into Sosmix and make mashed potato.Very cheap,lightweight 100 to 150gms per person,good high calorie.
    Just been packing a 5 day backpack trips food this comes to just over 4kgs including All food,gas,stove,pans,waterbag,bowl,mug.
    Its great at the end of 5 days the pack is so light and you think do you really need a 35litre sack couldnt you make do with 20litre..
    Another excuse for a blow out,and i may even be able to see my feet if i have lost some weight..good luck chris

  19. #19
    Ultra King Imperial Dave's Avatar
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    my lightweight food selection always includes a packet of bombay mix (especially good for winter!), some assorted nuts, raisons, packet or two of crisps (mainly for the salt), a couple of cereal (inc some chocolate) bars. for warm food I always take ready made dried pasta meals (Tescos own brand), super noodles (!), and ready rice (just needs to steam/heat) + normally take either tin of tuna to mix in or packet ham or similar


  20. #20
    Ultra King Mikel el Bastardo's Avatar
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    If you really need a hot lunch then pick a route with a pub in the middle!
    For instance, Glen Coe. Start up the Anoach Eagach east to west, prawn cocktail, poached salmon, apple crumble and 14 pints in the Clachaig, then belt up 'dinnertime buttress' on Bidian. Run along the tops, add on the two Beauchilles, descend curved ridge and be in time for a good nosh-up in the Kingshouse:0)

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