Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: 54 Climbers Summit Everest

  1. #1
    Ultra King Orange Alex Ford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,894
    I'm in a quandry about this news...one one side I think that the mountains are there for anyone and everyone, but the other says that surely this number of people summiting can't be good for either to people or the mountain?

    I know that Nepal needs the cash from the climbing permits and such, but in the wake of what happened up there in 1996, surely queue's to get up the Hillary Step should never happen again...

  2. #2
    ‹bermensch Ben Hedley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    3,556
    hmmmm...reminds me of this artical

  3. #3
    Ultra King Orange Alex Ford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,894
    Yes...very true...maybe there is something interesting hidden away in Al Lee's stuff!

  4. #4
    ‹bermensch Ben Hedley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    3,556
    ahhhhh..seeeeeeeeeeeee...hes not all unreadable waffle eh

    lol sorry....

    an we have AL transfer to OM or trail please????

  5. #5
    Ultra King Orange Alex Ford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,894
    AL in Trail...it'd never work!

    Back to the subject...

    Does the word Everest stimulate that much emotion anymore...

    I noted that that lady was the "first American woman to summit from North and South"...thereby implying that other women have done that before...

  6. #6
    ‹bermensch Ben Hedley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    3,556
    personally i think that al the old spirit of climbing and exploration has been lost on everest...anyone who has the mone can do it now....

  7. #7
    Ultra King Orange Alex Ford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,894
    Which is a fir point....in an ironic way...money has brought about a climbing democracy...Any one with the cash can go climbing.

  8. #8
    Initiate Dave Moseley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    914
    depends why they do it then though, whether it's for the satisfaction or to impress people at parties, personally I find it a bit sad in that it's being seen as an asset to some, fair game for exploitation, which I feel uneasy about, I definately think it encourages some guides to take people up who are not really fit or experienced enough, I wonder if this years numbers are more to do with the conditions at the moment making it a bit easier, it would be interesting to see how many people have attempted it this year, I would be more concerned if THAT number had increased significantly over previous years

  9. #9
    Ultra King Dave O aka Jungle Dave ;)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    5,638
    Yea but surely the increased number of climbers has had a beneficial effect on the local economy?
    But on the other hand what about the impact of all those people trudging up everest major erosion factor or what?

  10. #10
    ‹bermensch Si's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,377
    I think the major concern is the trail up to base camp.
    If I recall correctly, its been reported that there is very little rubbish on Everest itself, but the "Kleenex Trail" is absolutely littered with detritus such as plastic drinks bottles, carrier bags, human waste etc.
    But clearing up the trail is much less glamorous (and therefore less likely to attract sponsorship) than cleaning up Everest itself.

    Si(C)

  11. #11
    Initiate Dave Moseley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    914
    but does the local economy need any help, we seem to look at these places and compare the standard of living with ours, then proceed to mess with local economies till they're as bad as ours, who's to say that our way of life is better than theirs?, and why am I not in the pub?...........
    answers to these and other questions on a postcard or sealed down envelope (with a tenner in it) to.........

  12. #12
    Super Moderator Jon Doran's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    10,414
    In Nepal's case, yeah, I think it's fair to say that the local economy does need help. It's a desperately poor country and relies on tourism to a disproportionate extent. I know what you're getting at about relative standards of living and value systems, but for a lot of Nepalis, involvement in tourism seems to be the difference between scraping an existence and doing slightly better.

    As far as Everest goes, it's been said before, but the main ecological threats in the area are from trekkers, not the expeditions at all.

    And Alastair Lee - no more 'Leesides', but he'll be back under a different title. :-)

  13. #13
    ‹bermensch Drew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,821
    The trouble is tho, that all the damage is so isolated. The "Kleenex trail" is so narrow, that outside of it the is no extra litter, but also no tourism money, as everbody just wants to get to base camp. Fair cop, the Naplese government are poor, very poor, and they have had the good idea of taking extortionate amounts of money for people to climb Everest.

    THe trouble comes when it's the rich people who have people to look after their surrounding for them (servants, butlers etc) who don't know what sort of impact they will cause, come along and travel the way they're used to travelling. Creating sh*t loads of waste. I mean there wasn't a problem about waste in Nepal until the climbers, and rich people came in. Now they have serious problems.

    The only way that Nepal can live through this, is by making sure that every team and group, have some sort of designated person (assigned by the government) who has been trained in this sort of thing, and knows how to live in harmony with the surroundings. They will then help to sort everything out, but they will have to give instructions, and they must be given the authority to stop a team from climbing. it must be possible for them to say stop, and that team must not climb any higher. They could employ Sherpa's, as they would know what to do.


    I don't know if anyone rmembers what I said I really wanted to do... if you can't then I'll remind you:




    Grand Slam:
    North America Mt. Mckinley
    Africa Kilimanjaro
    Asia Mt. Everest
    Europe Mount Elbrus (Russia)Antarctica Mount Vinson
    South America Mount Aconcagua
    Australaisia Carstensz Pyramid (Irian Java)
    Magnetic South Pole
    Geographic South Pole
    Magnetic North Pole
    Geographic North Pole



    Plus Challenge 8000:
    Everest (Chomolungma/Sagarmatha) 8,848m
    K2 (Qogir Feng) 8,611m
    Kangchengjunga 8,586m
    Lhotse I 8,516m
    Makalu I 8,463m
    Cho Oyu 8,201m
    Dhaulagiri 8,167m
    Manaslu I 8,163m
    Nanga Parbat 8,125m
    Annapurna 8,091m
    Gasherbrum I 8,068m
    Broad Peak 8,047m
    Gasherbrum II 8,035m
    Shisha Pangma 8,013m





    However I would like to spend a year living with Sherpa's doing what they did before climbing expeditions started to employ them. Also getting used to the rarified atmosphere. Maybe (if they have the genes) I can increase my lung size which would help my chances at high altitude.

  14. #14
    ‹bermensch Drew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,821
    However I would try to respect Nepal as much as possible and so the year would mostly involve changing my thinking from Western to Neplaese.

  15. #15
    ‹bermensch joan collins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,023
    I walked along part of the 'Everest Trail' last year (Lukla to Namche), and I saw very little of what we would call 'litter', as in stuff just dropped on the path. What I saw was (ironically) mostly dropped by local porters, who eat instant noodles straight out of the packet on the trail and drop the packaging wherever.

    I didn't see an appreciable amount of human waste, either. People are gradually being educated (often by the use of noticeboards) to use only the proper lavatories, which are hole-in-the-ground sheds. This does create a concentration of waste in specific locations, but much of it is of course biodegradable, so the pile naturally reduces outside the trekking seasons.

    What's more of a problem is leftover packaging. All these tourists and support staff need feeding and watering by the lodges. What the lodges could do is to offer only rice, potatoes, eggs, cabbage, tea, and other food which can be either produced locally or transported in biodegradable packaging. But tourists demand bottled water, beer, coca cola, crisps, biscuits, tinned food, etc. So all this stuff has to be brought in, and when it's consumed, the waste has to be disposed of. Everyone knows how much kitchen waste the average western household produces at home, and if tourists demand the same foods and particularly drinks in Nepal, a similar amount of waste packaging is generated. Some of it does actually get carried out in bulk, almost exclusively glass bottles, but the rest remains and gradually piles up.

    All it would take to significantly reduce the waste problem is for tourists to start drinking tea instead of bottled and canned products. But the paranoid Americans, ironically the worst whiners about waste, demand packaged drinks and food, and so does anyone else who can afford it. And the lodge owners are not averse to receiving the profits they can make. Unfortunately, capitalist international trade once introduced is not easy to eradicate.

Similar Threads

  1. Indian Police Climbers on Everest. DId They Summit or Not?
    By Trevor DC Gamble in forum Soapbox
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 22-03-2017, 03:19 PM
  2. Talkback: Bounty Bar On Everest Summit...
    By Metric Kate in forum Article talkback
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 07-02-2017, 03:29 PM
  3. Talkback: Did My Ice Axe Summit Everest?
    By pete-rbg in forum Article talkback
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 22-06-2011, 12:38 PM
  4. 3G network for Everest climbers
    By Paddywacker in forum Soapbox
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-11-2010, 01:40 PM
  5. FHM sneers at Everest climbers...
    By Jon Doran in forum Soapbox
    Replies: 78
    Last Post: 23-09-2003, 11:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •