Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 38 of 38

Thread: How many trekking poles are needed for long distance hiking

  1. #21
    Ultra King Peter Clinch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,252
    Quote Originally Posted by Toot View Post
    Peter Clinch - they're exactly the pole pages I was referring to. Hope they're of use to the OP. I'm not sure what the protocol is so I wonder, is it OK if I point new pole users to those pages other than via this forum?
    No problem with that Toot, they're there for info so the more people that get something out of them, the better.

    Pete.

  2. #22
    Tks Trevor. The second page is also very helpful. Get a chance to practice in this journey.

  3. #23
    Tks Toot. Could see lots of valuable experiences to learn from you. Not in a real sense used any poles before (except some rough stick instantly made from branches ). With so many useful tips from your pros, time to expect a challenging and exciting journey.

  4. #24
    Efficient way to fix the poles. That will help. Tks Taz. There is no way to feel not shining with a charming smile outside and young heart inside. -_-

  5. #25
    Übermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    United Kingdom, Tunbridge Wells area.
    Posts
    4,894
    Quote Originally Posted by Aslongdeal View Post
    Tks Toot. Could see lots of valuable experiences to learn from you. Not in a real sense used any poles before (except some rough stick instantly made from branches ). With so many useful tips from your pros, time to expect a challenging and exciting journey.
    Well I suppose if you think far enough back in time the first walking poles were actually nothing much more than these such simple wood staffs cut from branches; likely as in from Biblical times onwards really then I guess.Like with everything else the subject just got technical! Both in design and in their technique of usage.
    Last edited by Trevor DC Gamble; 27-03-2017 at 02:44 PM.
    Trevor DC Gamble

  6. #26
    Ultra King Peter Clinch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,252
    I'm increasingly of the opinion that the 90 degree elbow thing is not as smart as it might be. The article Trevor linked to suggested that was the best way to get weight on, but observe the use of crutches... Taking all the weight, straighter is better.

    Pete.

  7. #27
    Übermensch Taz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    3,119
    You mean as in shorter poles? I like mine quite long but thats probably a personal preference and not necessarily the correct one.

    Its also worth looking into how to look after your poles. Mine slip sometimes and its worth doing a bit of simple maintenance to prevent these things.

    http://sectionhiker.com/how-to-fix-t...t-stay-locked/
    Last edited by Taz; 28-03-2017 at 06:46 AM.

  8. #28
    Ultra King Peter Clinch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,252
    I wouldn't want to say there's a "correct" way to use poles, it's whatever works for you.

    But I do take issue with, "It is hard to load (bear down on) your poles with your arm grossly extended or bent. (See how much less force you can generate at 180° or 0° than at 90°, for example.)"

    If you want to lean all of your weight on your arms then having them straight, so the bones can take the force rather than muscles, is very much the best way. If someone is mantle-shelfing up using their arms they quite naturally have their arms as straight as possible. So saying you can get more force on at 90 degrees elbows rather than straight is just mince.

    Pete.

  9. #29
    Übermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    United Kingdom, Tunbridge Wells area.
    Posts
    4,894
    Point of note -

    Just to let both Taz, and others here that like to helpfully put up links for others to look at, know for the record that the proprietor/owner of that particular website Sectionhiker in the USA, is well known to be vastly against anyone publishing online links to his website whatsoever at all, apparently for any reason! He has in the past complained bitterly to Jon about my having done so on here, and demanding that Jon delete the threads/links completely under threat of legal action towards this site, and myself personally by direct email. He feels it seems that anyone publishing links that publicise his site works are trying to steal or plagarise the information, even going so far as to accuse me of trying to steal his work and claim it for myself by my having done nothing more than just promoting a link to his site there in a post here on this forum. A heads up warning to everyone there then in this case, ok! The proprietor there does not seem to be a very happy nor pleasant fellow really, I found just last year with this kind of situation! Be warned folks!I can tell you from personal painful experience that it is not very nice at all to get threatening emails from this particular chap that runs that Sectionhiker outdoors website, ok.
    Last edited by Trevor DC Gamble; 28-03-2017 at 10:33 AM.
    Trevor DC Gamble

  10. #30
    Übermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    United Kingdom, Tunbridge Wells area.
    Posts
    4,894
    http://www.tgomagazine.co.uk/walking-poles/

    Chris Townsend of course always known to be a very big advocate of using walking poles outdoors on longer treks. Till recently at least, since I seem to recall his having written more recently of having changed that opinion significantly. Anyone know where the link to that such might be please? On his own website perhaps?I cannot seem to locate it at all.

    http://www.christownsendoutdoors.com...ing-poles.html
    Trevor DC Gamble

  11. #31
    Übermensch Taz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    3,119
    I'm not overly worried as I'm not a prolific link poster.
    I'll delete it if it becomes an issue.

    Thanks Pete for your advice, did 7m today with 'tweeked' poles. Got to give them a service next ready for sime serious hiking in 2 weeks.
    Last edited by Taz; 28-03-2017 at 05:48 PM.

  12. #32
    Initiate Toot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Cornwall UK
    Posts
    557
    I am grateful that Peter Clinch allows free reference to be made to his Pole Pages - there's something helpful, familiar and reassuring about that permission, especially in light of some other comments made about information sharing here. I feel compelled to mention something about that and although acknowledging it's off the OP's topic, I believe his question has been answered and my thoughts are not unrelated to how that came about.

    Here's a thing - when I was a spotty-faced yoof around 1970, I found great delight in knowing a couple of experienced wanderers who were endlessly patient in answering face-to-face questions and freely offering hints help tips and advice about hiking camping and anything associated with it. So far as I can remember that's how information was commonly shared and much knowledge gained in pre-internet days. The process saved a lot of trial-and-error and wasting of time and money so I soon saw and valued how the process worked. It also meant it took time and effort to discover things and that brought some understanding of them which in turn was reflected in the time and effort it took to pass it on. In time, with some ability gained, I was careful to repeat the courtesy I had been shown and I regard that as a good and proper continuation of a useful tradition. A principle of respect with regard to it has brought many advantages over the years.

    In those "olden days", knowledge wasn't easily available from scores or hundreds or thousands of sources as it is via the internet now. If you wanted to discover and learn something back then - or if you wanted to pass on something meaningful - it took more effort than a few perhaps unknowing taps on a keyboard to do so. Thinking back on those days I have groaned several times about not discovering something until the internet revealed it later, but on the other hand I have also been glad that some claptrap provided online now isn't what I had to learn from in the past! Criticism or commendation can depend very much on material content or delivery of it.

    What I can recall no example of from yesteryear, is anyone who freely offered good information yet became annoyed if it was passed on - useful info was bound to be passed on and everyone seemed to accept that was the case. Advice once commonly flowed from mouth to ear, details were retained in memory, then later it was passed in turn from mouth to another ear and that's how learning spread. With this in mind, I initially found it very odd to read that providing links to Section Hiker articles had brought complaints from authors, requests for deletion, suggestion of plagiarism, and vent of personal feelings.

    In my view the Section Hiker pages commonly contain quality material that may well benefit many people to know, and surely that is why those pages are generously made available for all to view for free. Having checked, I even noted that Section Hiker provide buttons on their own pages so material can easily be spread by way of Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, so I really did wonder what might cause agitation and complaint about sharing of their work? Could it be the world of helpful people as I once knew it has changed? Is the outdoors world really now full of unhappy and unpleasant fellows?

    Peter Clinch is a clear example of someone who will permit his work to be used freely to benefit others - all it took to confirm this was to ask him and an old tradition of rendering free assistance was reassuringly found to remain in place. I like that - so what happened with Section Hiker by comparison, as suggested in posts above? Well, I bet the very clear words "© Copyright 2007-2017, Section Hiker.com and Fells Press LLC. All Rights Reserved. No duplication without permission" at the bottom of every Section Hiker online page has a lot to do with it. This surely offers an explanation for the Section Hiker stance and illustrates some difference in the world today that couldn't have existed years ago.

    Information gained and passed on face-to-face in the past is a mile away from information gained by others and put online today, especially where someone else then decides to make use of today's detail as they see fit despite a Copyright warning, a statement that all rights are reserved, and advice that no duplication should take place without permission. Anyone who repeatedly ignores such warnings should not be surprised if they receive a terse complaint, nor should they attribute that result to someone being of unpleasant character. Where someone complains because warnings are ignored, the blame for what results surely doesn't rest with the first individual, but with the latter who doesn't pay heed nor give sufficient thought to their own actions.

    Yes, let us admire the unlimited generosity of people like Mr Clinch who will allow free use of some of their own material for the benefit of others, but let's not have someone who's work is put online for all to see with the addition of clear notice that all rights to that content are reserved, be put down as unpleasant fellows because they stress those rights are to be respected.

  13. #33
    Übermensch Taz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    3,119
    I got one the links off youtube and one off google search, and asumed it was okay to share. I guess the problem is people making money out of shared info, in this case I guess it benefits OM in some way.

    What was really good about OM was the shared experiences of people and not pages of links. Ironically I too posted a few links and maybe should not get into bad habits nothing beats advice handed down from those with experience.
    Last edited by Taz; 29-03-2017 at 02:54 PM.

  14. #34
    Initiate Toot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Cornwall UK
    Posts
    557
    I'd agree that if someone wanted to make their wish to reserve all rights to reproduction clear, the best place to make that known is at the head of a page or post where it's most likely to be seen, rather than at the very end where it is far less likely. It is of course easy to download copy and re-post things from the internet and we've all got used to that - it's a fact of life and that ability isn't going to be rewound. The best any author who puts stuff online can hope, is that his stated wishes for it are treated with respect. The music industry must be most painfully aware of how often copyright is flaunted and income and other credit lost, but any creative effort could suffer the same. I don't think it's any wonder that a single author might feel aggrieved if a clear wish to retain their rights is made known yet repeatedly ignored - a terse response is as much an indication of disrespect or contempt felt, or exasperation with it, as reaction to any loss of income in many cases I expect.

    Generally I believe there is reasonable allowance made in law for "educational purpose" reproduction, but what constitutes that can vary from one opinion to another of course. Except where NO REPRODUCTION is stressed, I suspect that a single post with author acknowledgement and no inappropriate use of the material would commonly be accepted, and rightly so in my view. Repeated "plagiarism" may be met with resignation or a silent grumble, although where a publishing company feels their toes are being stepped on, or income is being lost (or made by someone else), or inappropriate use is being made of copyrighted material, then a stronger reaction may result. I'm not sure there is a definitive answer, but a bit of thought before blindly repeating someone else's work might cut down a lot of arguments or ill-feeling!

    I cannot agree more with the idea that sharing direct experiences with real people is one of the greatest pleasures in relation to outdoors activities - and surely one of the best ways of learning about a practical subject. I found that as a youth, and the reason I joined OM was because I saw similar examples in these pages - in fact I once regarded OM as a fine antidote to other "outdoors" websites that I thought spouted too many misguided opinions and presented far too much dross. The internet can get close to a useful personal interaction in some cases, and it does hold much information worthy of sharing, but what is drivel and what is the really good stuff isn't necessarily determined by how easy something is to find, how often it is re-posted, or who provides it. That was the thing about the "old days" (pre-internet) - there may have been less opinions or experiences readily at hand, but those that were found were more likely to come from considered personal experience than a thoughtless or unaware posting or re-posting of endless links to who-knows-what from who-knows-who. Selectivity is the key to efficient learning and the best of that surely require a bit more knowledge than can be gained from posts on the internet alone. Nothing beats advice handed down from those with experience? Mostly true I'd say...

  15. #35
    Übermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    United Kingdom, Tunbridge Wells area.
    Posts
    4,894
    Neither Jon then OM Editor on here nor myself, though return of emails on the subject, could really make out exactly why the guy was so especially upset at all essentially. It was most odd, since no one else seems ever to have complained thus before him. Unless of course he thought that OM or myself were somehow or other making money from his work by the posting of such links here. He certainly strangely seems not to go chasing and threatening others with legal action, for similarly posting such links to his website content where it is being used by various folks to help sell their tents and the such like - utilising his site reviews - on a good few Ebay stores online, for sure! Go figure!!
    Last edited by Trevor DC Gamble; 30-03-2017 at 01:19 PM.
    Trevor DC Gamble

  16. #36
    Widdler
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    United State
    Posts
    7
    One pole is fine for me, I always refuse to getting extra weight.

  17. #37
    Ultra King Peter Clinch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,252
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis L. Ward View Post
    One pole is fine for me, I always refuse to getting extra weight.
    Shirley if you don't want any extra weight you'd be better off with none?

  18. #38
    Are you wondering how to get a multitasking skill to do a few things simultaneously? have a look here and you will get it!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •