Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 46

Thread: Food that doesn't need cooking

  1. #1
    ‹bermensch Dan G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,953
    If you were to go off for a multiday backpack but were not carrying any form of heating, what would you take to eat?

  2. #2
    Initiate Bob C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    716
    Plenty of mixed nuts/dried fruit.
    Some dense bread for carbs - dark rye bread for instance (stays quite fresh).
    A good chunk or two of that fatty pork saucisson - maybe not the healthiest option but plenty of energy stored.
    A bit of fresh fruit depending on how much I fancied carrying.
    Maybe some fig rolls.
    Plenty of toilet paper.

  3. #3
    Ultra King Orange Alex Ford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,894
    Some pre-cooked rice salad sort of thing...maybe even a pasta salad?

    Tuna (but I hate the stuff myself) so maybe some tinned mackerel or whatever.

    Gotta say, never underestimate the power of a warm meal and a cup of hot chocolate! (so I'd always take some form of heating up device!)

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Jon Doran's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    10,414
    Alles mit Speck! I would take a stove simply because the most effective way of carrying food multiday is in dried form so you'd save enough weight for the stove to pay its way overall. Otherwise, fat is the most effective weight per calorie thingee. Once met some teenage Austrian hotshot in Huaraz who claimed to live entirely on 'Speck' in the moutains. Bascially a block of fat with a few marbled shreds of meat in it. Yuk... Also, fat takes ages to digest. One plus point is that if you are running on fat burning mode - long, slow, steady - your body stops burning fat while it still has loads left. Apparently a new fat injection that point fools the body into thinking that more fat is on the way, so it can resume burning the existing supplies.

    Twight's book Extreme Alpinism is good for this sort of thing btw. Tastes papery though...

  5. #5
    ‹bermensch Si's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,377
    Chorizo sausage for flavour, dried fruit, malt loaf maybe?

    What about the energy gels and carb powder used by runners et al?

    Although, like Jon says, its probably worth looing at how much weight you'd save taking dehydrated stuff and compare that to your stove and fuel.

    Why are you considering this? Is it just for weight saving?

    Si(C)

  6. #6
    ‹bermensch joan collins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,023
    I too would tend to pack a stove in preference to ready to eat food. And if I was going on a multiday backpack in the UK, or indeed most parts of Europe, I simply wouldn't bother to pack food for the whole trip, as you're never far from a shop/pub/cafe. The Tunnocks teacake has a wide-ranging natural habitat, and I'd rather pay 20p more for a pack than lug it all the way from my local Tesco.

    It's always useful to have some no-cook food around though, and my preferences would be:
    - bread and buns, especially the long-life German rye loaves you can get from health shops
    - oatcakes
    - cheese
    - Tartex vegetarian pate in tube
    - good pesto sauce
    - chocolate, cereal bars and sweeties
    - couscous. Sammy's brand includes flavorings.
    - dried instant kosher houmous
    - nusstorte filling mix (ground hazelnuts, sugar and cocoa) which can be made into a paste or a drink or eaten as is.

    All of these have a low water content, a high calorie value, and other nutritional benefits.

  7. #7
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    33,625
    You can get a pre-sliced malt loaf and pop the Flora on it B4 U set off. If it suddenly gets very hot, gobble it up B4 the fat goes rancid.

    Tasty, full of carbs and fat, too - energy on the hoof.

    Ben is particularly fond of it.

  8. #8
    Mini Goon simon white 1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    63
    never use to take a stove on one dayers but since purchusing a msr SUPERFLY stove and a friend from the forces gave me shed loads of there pre cooked and foil packed food I'd never go with our it not just boil the packet for 8 min then eat from packet couldn't be simpler and much nicer then flat sandwich's etc

  9. #9
    Ultra King Orange Alex Ford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,894
    The military stuff can also be eaten cold. (It does taste like crap in that case mind!)

    It does make a really good emergency "ratio" for on the hills. There is even a little Hexamine fold out burner and that as well as two boil in the bags can be easily fitted into a single mess tin...and you can use the water afterwards to make a cuppa out of!

  10. #10
    Ultra King Orange Alex Ford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,894
    That should of course read emergency "ratioN" not ratio!

    READ BEFORE SUBMIT DAMMIT!!!

  11. #11
    ‹bermensch joan collins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,023
    Alex, can military fodder be bought by civilians? And is it 'good' compared to other food, or just good compared to going hungry?

  12. #12
    Initiate neil rich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    669
    we'll have the definitive word from Alex, but I've found them to be identical to the meals made by a leading manufacturer in the british market (forgotton which one)just with instructions aimed at soldiers, ' once open, keep the top pointing at the sky' sort of thing, (sorry Alex, couldn't resist) I've always found them scarce when trying to buy them from ex-military outlets and cadge them from forces friends when I can.
    When we came back from Vegas after new year everybody else in the family bought souveniers, I filled my bag with US ex-military rations (sad I know)

  13. #13
    Initiate Mark Phillips's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    698
    Any trip longer than a day, I will always take a stove.

    Compo Rations.... Great stuff, taste good but always best supplemented with fresh fruit & veg where ever possible. If not, your first visit to the craper will be one you won't forget for a while!!!!

    : o

    M


  14. #14
    ‹bermensch Dan G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,953
    OK the story behind this is thus:

    Talking about the 3,000ers made me think about carrying too much, leading to the 'summer pack' thread, which reminded me of a random Outside article which I dug out. It's the April 2002 issue page 116 and describes gear to make 'backpacking feel more like hiking', and it's full of top stuff.

    A tip is to 'forsake the stove', and 'eat Baby Ruths for breakfast, bagels for lunch, buffalo jerky and dried apricots for dinner'. Not sure what half of that lot is (jerky?), but it got me thinking.

    I'm a crap cook and worse when camping, so lugging a stove about is hardly worth it for me anyway. Taking ready to eat food appeals!

    Nutrition doesn't matter when back packing for a few days, you do't really need a 'balanced diet'. Most important thing is bunging enough energy down your throat. Best food fot that is sugar, which is easier for your bod to 'burn' and packs a helluva high energy density. But you can;t just spoon down 500g of sugar a day, hence this thread for better ideas. I'v got my own but it mostly revolves around biscuits, Kitkats, peanuts and dried fruit!

    I remember David Parr talking about something similar before. He said he just carried loads of Mars bars. 'Why mess arounbd cooking in the pouring rain when you can just sit under a tree and stuff Mars bars?' I think is what he said!

  15. #15
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    33,625
    Ahhh but that way madness lies - or at least acne and nausea.


    One of my fave moments when camping is to get back 'home' to my liitle tent and to put a brew on - just soooooo comforting.

  16. #16
    Ultra King Orange Alex Ford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,894
    Never underestimate the power of a hot drink.


    As for compo...It's really very good considering! Some particular things are superb...I recently had one of the "New" vegetarian menus, which was fantastic. Certain things are always sought after and almost anything will be swapped for say...A lancashire Hotpot bag. But there are some things that are poor. I don't like the Chocolate pudding in choc sauce. (some poeple really do mind...I think my experiences of it come from eating it partially cold! If it had been fully hot I'm sure it would have been better!)

    One thing to remember, Compo does have a rather "binding" effect on the bowels! (or it does me and several others I know!) I wouldn't recommend eating it for a prolonged period of time.

    (I'm gonna get scatalogical here....) Poos tend to become rather errrrrrmmmmm "sticky" when you eat compo and that can be rather uncomfortable and unpleasant when say, wild camping!

    Oh and the instructions for use have to be for eed-jets! I'm one of them!

    My experince of talking to the US forces is that they prefer to try and get hold of our stuff (like our NBC suits they are just plain better).

    As for buying it...I dunno...they tend to last for so long that they will be kept forever and not got rid of to army surplus dealers, I guess.

  17. #17
    ‹bermensch Dan G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,953
    I've heard that the US like ours better too but they get bite-size choccy bars and M&Ms to cheer them up, which is nice.

    Hexa stove/mess tin/Wayfarer (I think they must be the people who make the Forces stuff) looks promising, though a hot meal/drink isn't that important to me.

  18. #18
    ‹bermensch Dan G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,953
    Know several people in the OTC (basically TA for students) and I really like the look of their 24hr Ration Packs. Little cardboard boxes full of everything you need for a day, you just take as many as you need, sweet. Love to get my hands on some. Maybe you could ask around Jeannie?

    And what's 'compo'?

  19. #19
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    33,625
    Well i use it to butter charlies (bricks) together but I don't thing it's quite the same....

  20. #20
    Ultra King Orange Alex Ford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,894
    Compo is the military slang for the military 24hr ration packs. I don't know the history behind it...I just call it compo!

    The theory behind the ration pack is that you get a balanced menu for a days eating...breakfast, say bacon and beans, crackers and spreading cheese and bisuits for a lunch, and say Beef stew and dumplings with choc pudding for dinner and afters!

    They also have a little bag of chewing gum (PK...remember that oldies?) a couple of fantastic chocolate bars, and misc biscuits, hot drinks (incl...the BEST hot chocolate in the world and dried tea/coffee) and a soup. There's also a nice menu list to see what your mates are having for their tea, and a packet of tissues (for toilet duty!)

    I think that there's also a nice comforting message about SSAFFA looking after your family at home whilst you are getting shot at in the field! Oh and probably something about making a will.

    The blurb says that you should NOT swap foods, and eat/drink everything to get your full quota of vitamines/nutrients/calories etc.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 39
    Last Post: 22-09-2015, 09:47 AM
  2. cooking, preparation, storage, consumption of food
    By Luke Womersley2 in forum Gear
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 18-10-2013, 02:58 PM
  3. Chinese Food is Healthy Food Say the Experts!
    By Trevor D Gamble in forum Soapbox
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 24-07-2008, 05:06 PM
  4. Food and cooking
    By Matt Devlin in forum Starting out?
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 15-06-2007, 10:10 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •