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Thread: So...What Is In Your First Aid Kit Then?

  1. #1
    ‹bermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
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    ‹bermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
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    Ultra King Peter Clinch's Avatar
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    Did a mountain first aid course some moons ago. At the end one of my fellow students asked the instructor what he carried and we were quite surprised when he said either nothing or a roll of gaffer tape, but it makes perfect sense. When it's about life-saving first aid is far more about what you do than what you've got, and the material side of it can largely be improvised. Particularly triangular bandages, which the First Aid community tends to have a bit of aThing about...

    Most of the stuff in mine is about comfort: some mild pain killers, plasters, tape etc. The tick hook is probably the most important thing in there these days, in terms of both the amount of use and potential for long term effect.

    Pete.

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    ‹bermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
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    Amen to that one there, Peter.
    Trevor DC Gamble

  5. #5
    Mini Goon
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    I think the first aid community has moved on thankfully Peter. I've been first aid trained for about 35 years. back in the old days it was almost like an origami class with triangular bandages. Now, unless my experience is unusual, it's a lot more pragmatic. For me, the only essential components in a first aid kit is the knowledge you have in your head and the ability to keep that head cool when the poo hits the fan.

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    Super Moderator captain paranoia's Avatar
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    I did a 3-year refresher recently. As in the first time, my performance in the simulated exercises was pretty poor (we all were, I think). Not the actual treatment stuff; that went okay. But the broader situation management stuff. Too focussed on treating the obvious casualty symptoms, and not communicating well enough with patient, group members and fellow rescue party.

    Sadly, that, for me, will probably only come with lots of practice that I'm unlikely to get to do. Shows how valuable exercises must be for volunteers like MRT.

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    Super Moderator Metric Kate's Avatar
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    You're right, captain, exercises are absolutely essential, though of course you learn more from doing it for real (something I've only rarely had to do, thank goodness!)

    I try to get friends who aren't team members to be casualties during our regular 'real-time' exercises because team members will treat the 'casualties' very differently if they don't know them, so a bit more realistic. It's a lot of effort to use moulage (fake injuries) though, so it's still some way from the real thing.

    On the other matter - if you're doing the first aid for MR, you're not worrying about group management, communication, evacuation, other people are doing that. So it's harder work for the kind of situation you'd be more likely to be in when you're the 'responsible adult'.

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    Super Moderator captain paranoia's Avatar
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    It's a lot of effort to use moulage (fake injuries) though,

    Our instructor was a dab hand with make-up. Very quick to set up scenarios. And, despite the fact that we knew none of the conditions were real, actually remarkably stressful. It was the aspects other than treatment that were stressful, and I threw myself into the treatment as a way of coping with that stress, I think; something tangible I could do, and knew what to do.

    I need to work on the other aspects, probably by mental rehearsal, or using TV rescue programmes as scenarios. I might think about turning the sound down, and pretending I'm there, talking myself through the response... Fortunately, I live alone...

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    ‹bermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
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    Lol
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    Super Moderator Metric Kate's Avatar
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  11. #11
    Ultra King Peter Clinch's Avatar
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    A particularly entertaining/instructive "injury" was deployed on the first 2 day MC of S one I attended. High up on the To Do List is open up the airway, first man on the scene opened up the airway... and had a mouthful of yogurt spat in to his close-up face. Once we'd all stopped laughing and our casualty had reminded us that there might be vomit in there on the Real Thing, nobody ever made the mistake of being too close when the mouth was opened up again...

    The nature of the courses mean you need to do stuff, but folk are often reluctant to step forwards at first. Never bothered me, so I usually get my leaning mistakes in early with the bonus point that I've tended to get the gig as the Really Awkward Conscious Victim in the triage exercise near the end, which is great fun!

    Pete.

  12. #12
    Super Moderator Metric Kate's Avatar
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    Several years ago I was casualty on The First Exercise for the New Recruits, which was in January and happened to be in very snowy, cold weather with a brutal northerly. My remit was to be a mildly hypothermic snowboarder with a knee injury, but to be very pissed off and a PITA. Because of the depth of snow it took rather longer for the search parties to find me, so when they did, I was genuinely very cold despite the sleeping bag and bivvy bag I was in, and a bit grumpy, so I didn't really have to act!

    We get that pretend vomit stuff on our casualty care courses - usually a tin of cold spaghetti. How a 'casualty' actually holds that in their mouth in order to vomit on some trainee I don't know - it would certainly make me puke for real!

  13. #13
    ‹bermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
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    In the RAMC training they actually tell you, if you think you are going to puke that is ok! Just make sure you do so in a direction away from the casualty!
    Trevor DC Gamble

  14. #14
    Initiate -Dave-'s Avatar
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    I don't carry anything - used to carry one of those off the shelf things but came to the conclusion that a debilitating injury would require more than a small pair of scissors and a few plasters

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    ‹bermensch Trevor DC Gamble's Avatar
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    Lol! Especially up some of the places you Windy OM forum folk like to get to!
    Trevor DC Gamble

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