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Thread: Basic First Aid Kit

  1. #1
    Goon Jonno2's Avatar
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    I have a standard bought FAK that I usually carry. I'm wondering what actual items / quantities people carry for ultralight trips.

  2. #2
    Ultra King edwin's Avatar
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    A few cms of zinc oxide tape.

  3. #3
    Übermensch Rocky's Avatar
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    Ibuprofen and a bit of gaffer tape, which can also fix bust kit.

  4. #4
    Übermensch Jake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    Ibuprofen and a bit of gaffer tape, which can also fix bust kit.

    Ibuprofen? Heavyweight wuss . As Sgt Barnes would say, "Take the pain!!!".

    Seriously Jonno, like pack weight, the FAK has developed into something of a oneupmanship game. Grizzled harcore mountain men think nothing of re-attaching a severed limb using alength of gaffer tape before continuing their ascent of K2 and they are so tough that any lesser injury simply goes unnoticed.

    For us lesser mortals, a strip of sticking plaster, tick tweezers,compeed, a couple of needles, Imodium (I know, a true mountain man has such an iron constitution that he can drink untreated water fromthe Chernobyl sewage plant with no ill effects) Aspirin, and Ibuprofen are worth a few grammes of anyone's pack weight...

  5. #5
    Ultra King Mrs Nesbit's Avatar
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    Oneupmanship doesn't come into it. It's just about not carrying pointless tat that you won't need.

    Couple of painkillers and some gaffer tape for me too. Tick tool in season. If it can't be fixed with that, you're not going to be able to fix it yourself anyway.

  6. #6
    Ultra King Peter Clinch's Avatar
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    Really ultralight, don't bother. That's not faceatious, that's entirely relaistic: FAKs are about comfort to a far, far, far greater extent than they're about saving lives. Saving lives is more about procedures, not stuff.

    If it's carrying stuff as insurance against discomfort in the event of nasty conditions then you're not really doing "ultralight". If you really can't do without a little something, a bit of gaffer tape will cover most eventualities, as others have said.

    Pete.

  7. #7
    Übermensch Benco's Avatar
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    I find a small tube of TCP is useful, an infected graze isn't much fun. But the huge selection of plasters & bandages that grace most FAKs? if you need that many plasters you've got problems.

  8. #8
    Übermensch Jake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Clinch View Post

    Really ultralight, don't bother. That's not faceatious, that's entirely relaistic: FAKs are about comfort to a far, far, far greater extent than they're about saving lives. Saving lives is more about procedures, not stuff.

    If it's carrying stuff as insurance against discomfort in the event of nasty conditions then you're not really doing "ultralight". If you really can't do without a little something, a bit of gaffer tape will cover most eventualities, as others have said.

    Pete.
    Exactly, no-one ever saved a life with an ouch pouch.

  9. #9
    Ultra King Tytto tho Pesh's Avatar
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    did rocky mention he fixed his broken arm with gaffer tape and a bit of walking pole, and then walked himself off helvellyn?

    bet he could have done with a 2cmx2cm plaster though...

  10. #10
    Übermensch Jake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Posh Totty View Post

    did rocky mention he fixed his broken arm with gaffer tape and a bit of walking pole, and then walked himself off helvellyn?
    Told you - feckin' nails, these guys

  11. #11
    Ultra King
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Posh Totty View Post

    did rocky mention he fixed his broken arm with gaffer tape and a bit of walking pole, and then walked himself off helvellyn?
    Told you - feckin' nails, these guys

    Na Jake, just practical, how else you gonna get back !!

    When I dislocated my other kneecap, (not the one I've damaged now), I ' walked' 4 miles across rough ground in Scottish Highlands, to get back to help, using my rifle as a walking stick, avoiding troops searching for me !!! Took a while, but I got back there eventually.

  12. #12
    Ultra King Paddy Dillon's Avatar
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    You've got to be realistic with a first aid kit. Cuts and grazes... the odd blister... maybe a slight burn... these are the things that will happen on rare occasions, which you might want to fix. A broken leg... slit throat... heart attack... are rarer still and are largely beyond what you can fix yourself. I know a doctor whose 'first aid kit' for hill/mountain/outdoor events is so big that it fills three big packs and needs three people to carry it. Fair enough, it includes a stretcher, and you won't find me carrying a stretcher, simply because I wouldn't be able to carry me on a stretcher if anything happened to me! Nor can I give myself CPR when I'm lying unconscious... so I'll rely on someone else to do that... or manage without! If you carry a really hefty first aid kit, the likelihood is that you'll use it on someone else, rather than yourself. I've lost count of how many blisters I've treated on other people's feet, while my own feet remain blister-free, simply because I know the misery they cause, so I just don't bother getting them. For those who don't know... blisters are 100% preventable... and I guess by inference... so is everything else that requires first aid!

  13. #13
    Übermensch R_Mac's Avatar
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    My 1st aid kit in a mini ziplock contains the following,

    Tick Tweezers (in season)

    2x Compeed Patches

    4x Long Wide Elastoplast

    4 x Small Round Elastoplast

    1 x Large Square Elastoplast

    6 x Immodium

    10 x Ibuprofen

    2 x Antiseptic Wipes

    2 x Sterile Dressings

    Weight 36g

    Repair Kit in a mini ziplock contains

    Disposable Lighter wrapped in duct tape

    Length of Dyneema Guyline

    Linen Thread and Needle

    Pole Repair Sleeve

    2 x Spare Tent Pegs (1 x Skewer, 1 x Snowstake/Toilet trowel)

    Self Inflate Mat Repair (in season)

    2 x CRV 3 Button Cells (tent light and headtorch)

    Weight not Including Tent Pegs 47g

    Both carried in an Adventure Medical Ultralight .3 Pouch

    Total Weight 99g
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Clinch View Post

    Really ultralight, don't bother. That's not faceatious, that's entirely relaistic: FAKs are about comfort to a far, far, far greater extent than they're about saving lives. Saving lives is more about procedures, not stuff.

    If it's carrying stuff as insurance against discomfort in the event of nasty conditions then you're not really doing "ultralight". If you really can't do without a little something, a bit of gaffer tape will cover most eventualities, as others have said.

    Pete.
    If you're implying that going Ultralight means discomfort then I'd disagree. My base weight is currently about 5.5kg (thats about 500g off the Ultralight classification) I'm using an Phreeranger flysheet only but when I include a footprint and Bivvy bag it weighs about 1.5kg. I could actually increase the comfort/performance (comfort being relative) and reduce my base weight if I boughte.g. a Vaude Scutum at approx 1.0kg and used both inner and fly.

    As it is I'm not suffering discomfort due to any kit limitations,the only time recently I suffered discomfort was due to bad practice (sloping pitch).I'm carrying everything I couldrealistically needas far as actual equipment is concerned and my 1st aid kit follows the same principal.

  14. #14
    Ultra King Peter Clinch's Avatar
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    If you're implying that going Ultralight means discomfort then I'd disagree.

    Ultralight is about comfort rather than discomfort, but with considerably less insurance built in. Take, for example, Rab's lightest waterproofs: they'll keep you dry in dreich, and they'll be more comfortable to carry than their top of the line expedition kit... but they'd be much, much less like fun if the excrement really hits the air conditioning and you're in a full-on storm. Or a tarp rather than a twin skin tent: on the right night it's preferable, on the wrong night it'll be misery.

    So with a first aid kit, you carry less (down to nothing), but you cover less eventualities if something goes seriously off the rails. Though as mentioned above, your actual life saving tends not to be down to stuff in a FAK.

    Pete.

  15. #15
    Übermensch R_Mac's Avatar
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    I agree up to a point, it's about matching your gear to the conditions that can be reasonably expected and matching your FAK to the injuries that you can realistically deal with.

    Regarding waterproofs and shelters, what I've found is that those aren't the items that make the biggest difference to pack weight, an Akto is pretty proven and I imagine you could comfortably sit out aserious storm yet it's only about 800g heavier than a tarp, my Montane Venture should be prettycapable but is only about 275g heavier than my Marmot Essence.

    In the end the only person who can make the final decision on what gear is required is the individual as we all have different requirements and opinions with regard to comfort and the line between comfort/discomfort isn't set in stone.

  16. #16
    Übermensch El Manana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R_Mac View Post


    If you're implying that going Ultralight means discomfort then I'd disagree. My base weight is currently about 5.5kg (thats about 500g off the Ultralight classification) I'm using an Phreeranger flysheet only but when I include a footprint and Bivvy bag it weighs about 1.5kg.
    Is that 5.5kg list on your blog R_Mac? i wouldnt mind a look to see the differences from mine.

    For FAK, i would say Compeeds, a couple of elastoplasts, paracetemol, ibuprofen, antiseptic cream/wipes are a minimum for me. Anything else is a bonus.

  17. #17
    Übermensch R_Mac's Avatar
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    It's here El M,

    http://maceachain.blogspot.com/2010/...-kit-list.html

    Of course it changes depending on my mood so can go up and down. Last time out I took the Alpkit PD200 rather than the Xero 250 but took a Xero jacket rather than the PHD vest etc etc.

    You know how it is

  18. #18
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    I like to keep it lightweight but do carry a .5lt dry bag FAK.

    Tub of aspirin, after a recent long debate i carry them in case of heart attack, myself or a n other.

    Tick tool.

    2 x alcohol wipes.

    2 x migraleave.

    "2AA's for the gamma ( though not strictly medical)

    8 x paracetamol.

    2 x ibuprofen.

    4 x dihydrocodeine for if my knee goes twang again.

    4 x waterproof plasters.

    Pair of latex gloves, i have had call to use these before so always carry a pair now.

    Pole doctor wrapped with gaffer.

    Firesteel, though use my lighter as a smoker.

    Tiny pencil and tiny paper tags, for leaving notes if needed.

    Foil blanket.

    Fenistil, i react very badly to midges.

    Spare phone battery

    I have no idea what this weighs and don't care, it goes with me everytime i head out, all of it.

    Also in my day sack lives a lightweight sleeping bag, over kill i know but it weighs bugger all and compresses really small, in a day sack weighing in at around 2 - 2.5 kg total who cares.

  19. #19
    Ultra King Mikel el Bastardo's Avatar
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    You'll be sorted when that earthquake/hurricane/plague/tsunami strikes, Twiglegs.

  20. #20
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    It is a bit overkill but i won't take anything out, main reason is my son once took a fall, blood poured from his head, pack of compeed and 2 paracetamol wouldn't have been much use there.

    i was also fisrt on scene when a guy fell 30ft, none of my kit was any use in his case, i just stopped him moving till the mrt and paramedic got there.

    Accidents do happen in the hills, i like to be as prepared as possible.

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