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Thread: Wild camp gear musings

  1. #21
    Ultra King Imperial Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Petrie View Post
    Dave, do you have the grid ref for Carreg yr Ogof ?

    yes I'll pm you

    ah......you need to activate the PM function first

  2. #22
    ‹bermensch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fossil Bluff View Post

    Hi NPC (sorry for interupting )

    I saw that picture of yours(nice).. was it a 2.2, and if so how did you find it for space and comfort. Did the top catch water?

    I was thinking of one of these recently.
    Looks to me (can only see one entrance) like a Solar 2. I've had loads of tents come and go over the last few years but have had one of these the longest. I've used it in real hoolies, it's never budged and I have never been less than totally confident.

    It was a shame when TN discontinued it, I somehow can't warm to the 2.2 in the same way.


  3. #23
    Ultra King Matt C's Avatar
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    "Cleaning porridge out of a pan when you only have cold water and no kitchen is a pain..."

    True, but what's wrong with heating up a bit of water for washing out the pan?

    I know the cook-in-the-bag approach can be simple and effective at the time, but all those plastic bags heading for landfill.....?

  4. #24
    Ultra King edwin's Avatar
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    The Solar 2.2 is not greatly liveable for two. The sides are asymmetrical and the width is pretty much as narrow as you would not want to live with on more than an overnight.

    Mine pooled water on the top.

    It also stood up to a well-wild hooly at 2500m in Swisserland, very well.

    But the internal size led me to sell it after a season.

  5. #25
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fossil Bluff View Post

    Hi NPC (sorry for interupting )

    I saw that picture of yours(nice).. was it a 2.2, and if so how did you find it for space and comfort. Did the top catch water?

    I was thinking of one of these recently.
    We bought it 3 years ago so it is a Solar 2. I have been not-very-well for the past three years so it's the first time we have used it. No water caught on the top.

  6. #26
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt C View Post

    "Cleaning porridge out of a pan when you only have cold water and no kitchen is a pain..."

    True, but what's wrong with heating up a bit of water for washing out the pan?

    I know the cook-in-the-bag approach can be simple and effective at the time, but all those plastic bags heading for landfill.....?
    The plaggy bags can be taken off the hill, rinced and recycled at home. Washing out the pan takes effort, plus friction with a pan scourer which is then damp and yukky and needs to be stored and carried, and the bits of porridge end up in a mountain environment where they do not belong.

  7. #27
    Ultra King Jamie @ www.trekkingbritain.com's Avatar
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    We use our pour and stores as food containers for the fridge and then use them on the hills for the above purpose, they last for years!

  8. #28
    Ultra King Matt C's Avatar
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    Plastic bags can be recycled - until they split, and provided you can get them clean enough to be happy to keep and reuse them on a subsequent trip.

    It's easy enough to take them off the hill and bring them home if you're only out for a night or two, less so on on an extended trip or one to a foreign destination.

    My scourer can be rinsed and squeezed out almost dry and then lives inside my pan set where it helps to prevent things from rattling around. It could even live in a single, re-usable small plastic bag!

    Porridge is oats which is a) natural and b) biodegradeable. A few small scraps will most probably be scavenged, a larger amount could always be buried just like other 'natural waste' that backpackers leave in the mountain environment.

    We've tried the plastic bag approach, but find it doesn't work for us. We've also found that muesli made with hot milk is a simple and tasty alternative to porridge, only needs water heating and leaves no difficult washing up.

  9. #29
    ‹bermensch Jake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt C View Post

    My scourer can be rinsed and squeezed out almost dry and then lives inside my pan set where it helps to prevent things from rattling around. It could even live in a single, re-usable small plastic bag!

    Porridge is oats which is a) natural and b) biodegradeable. A few small scraps will most probably be scavenged, a larger amount could always be buried just like other 'natural waste' that backpackers leave in the mountain environment.

    We've tried the plastic bag approach, but find it doesn't work for us.

    Same here, Matt.

    I use a small piece of pan scourer, kept in small ziploc plastic bag in my pan set. Add a drop of biodegradable soapand heat a little water in the MSR kettle and it takes 2 minutes to wash up. Scatter the washing-up water and you're adding very little food waste to the ground (I'm assuming that you have already packed out any substantialfood scraps).

    I too have tried the plastic bagmethod but it doesn't work for me either.

  10. #30
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
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    Sleeping bags:

    I am still making great use of my Marmot Helium bag clicky.

    It's lovely. For a pillow, when car camping I either take a pillow from home or else use a Thermarest pillow with a cover made from a cheap Ikea fleece throw. I don't have space for that when backpacking though, so I stick spare clothing in a Fold drybag and seal it. One can always sneak in a bit of extra air so it's a wee bit like an inflatable one. For making an easy-to-fit pillow case, sew it with two overlapping flaps so that it tucks inside itself. Hard to explain, but no zip or velcro closure needed. Bit like a cash bag from the bank once it's been tucked round but with the overlap in the centre of the back.

    The pillows are an earlier version of these but don't have the pocket that tucks inside itself.

    Sleeping mat:

    We have had loads over the years. I (or my hips) gave up on Karrimats years back. I had an original Thermarest ultralight one - the burgundy topped one - but both ours started to leak after being thrashed. They did not guarantee a good night's rest. We have had Alpkit ones - leaked after a night and needed constant re-inflating - and various heavier ones. Last month we tried a pair of the new Thermarest Prolite ones. Supposed to be 30% lighter than the old ultralight ones. The stuff sacks are better - no broken nails trying to get the bugger inside it, they compress much more easily, and...AND we got a decent night's sleep! They are substantially improved. Dead comfortable, small when packed, and very light. Win-win.

  11. #31
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
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    Matt/Jake

    TBH, we are trying to avoid the use of a saucepan altogether when backpacking. So for us, a discussion about washing out of sticky porridge is academic.

    Now, about dehydrators.......hmmmmmm. Worth it?

  12. #32
    Ultra King Diddi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja Pussy Cat View Post

    Matt/Jake

    TBH, we are trying to avoid the use of a saucepan altogether when backpacking. So for us, a discussion about washing out of sticky porridge is academic.

    Now, about dehydrators.......hmmmmmm. Worth it?
    Imo yes they are.
    A bit of a wait on the hill but a lot less weight in the pack/on your back.

    And you would be better getting a pot cozy for the re-hydrating.

  13. #33
    Ultra King Diddi's Avatar
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    Start cheap Westfalia ...see what you think....

  14. #34
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt C View Post

    Plastic bags can be recycled - until they split, and provided you can get them clean enough to be happy to keep and reuse them on a subsequent trip.
    I think, in your first line, you mean re-used.

    I meant re-cycled, i.e. heated and submitted to a change of form.

  15. #35
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIDDY*THE TENT DEMON* View Post
    Start cheap Westfalia ...see what you think....
    Thanks for the link. The operating destructions mention drying pieces of fruit etc - what about an entire meal? Would a machine of that size/price dehydrate (say) a nice meal of home-made Lancashire Hotpot?

  16. #36
    Ultra King Matt C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja Pussy Cat View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt C View Post

    Plastic bags can be recycled - until they split, and provided you can get them clean enough to be happy to keep and reuse them on a subsequent trip.
    I think, in your first line, you mean re-used.

    I meant re-cycled, i.e. heated and submitted to a change of form.
    recycle Verb[-cling, -cled] 1. to reprocess (something already used) for further use: public demand for recycled paper 2. to pass (a substance) through a system again for further use
    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja Pussy Cat View Post
    The plaggy bags can be taken off the hill, rinced and recycled at home.
    I presumed you meant prepared for re-use, not melted down in your oven!

  17. #37
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt C View Post
    I presumed you meant prepared for re-use, not melted down in your oven!
    I don't run a recylcing plant - my council does it for me! I could melt down thermoforming polymers in the oven but I don't have a calendaring machine to re-form the bags... ;0

    p.s. your online dictionary - re-processing/passing through a system, mean re-forming, not rinse'n're-use. That would be re-using - like a milk bottle, which would need to be broken down into cullet to be re-cycled.

  18. #38
    ‹bermensch Jake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja Pussy Cat View Post

    Matt/Jake

    TBH, we are trying to avoid the use of a saucepan altogether when backpacking. So for us, a discussion about washing out of sticky porridge is academic.

    Now, about dehydrators.......hmmmmmm. Worth it?

    Now you're talking, NPC .

    I've been using a Stockli dehydratore for a couple of months now and it's great. I got one with stainless steel trays (these seemed a bit more effective than plastic ones) and with a timer so I could just start drying stuff and leave it overnight.

    I'm still working out which recipes work best but I can tell you the following:[*]home-cooked dehydrated food is a hell of a lot cheaper and better-tasting than any commercial dried food that you can buy;[*]it's perfectly possible to dehydrate an entire meal for backpacking - that's what most of the folk on here use them for;[*]you save a lot on weight; 400g of pasta and sauce typically dehydrates to 100 - 150g. A couple of days' food and you've saved the equivalent weight of your tent;[*]don't try to dehydrate a dish with a lot of fat in it. It's better to reduce the fat and add it back later at the rehydration stage e.g. by adding olive oil from a small bottle;[*]you do need to cut the food up into small pieces for it to dry properly. A Cannellini bean is about the largest piece of food that dries effectively.[/list]

    Give it a go - it really does make a difference to your pack weight and, given the right recipe, the food is excellent. Check out my (OK Jamie Oliver's) bolognese sauce recipe on this thread for a good example:

    http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/forum/f...t/4/UTN/28814/

    BTW re your pillow case point - I too use a drybag stuffed with clothes but I pull a Buff over it as a pillow case. The stretchiness of the Buff prevents it from falling off or creasing and itis much more comfortable than clammy silnylon against your face.

  19. #39
    Ultra King Matt C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja Pussy Cat View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt C View Post
    I presumed you meant prepared for re-use, not melted down in your oven!
    I don't run a recylcing plant - my council does it for me! I could melt down thermoforming polymers in the oven but I don't have a calendaring machine to re-form the bags... ;0

    p.s. your online dictionary - re-processing/passing through a system, mean re-forming, not rinse'n're-use. That would be re-using - like a milk bottle, which would need to be broken down into cullet to be re-cycled.
    I didn't see the dictionary definition as that narrow......

    Anyway, my council doesn't recycle plastic bags, so all the more reason for me to wash up my pan.....

  20. #40
    Ultra King Ninja Marmot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt C View Post
    I didn't see the dictionary definition as that narrow......

    Anyway, my council doesn't recycle plastic bags, so all the more reason for me to wash up my pan.....
    To a non-materials and components specialist, you wouldn't. Unfortunately, especially twice a year, round A-level marking time, I have to.

    Re the bags, luckily, mine does

    .

    p.s. loving all the food/dehydration help, guys. We looked into one years back and had various discussions on OM in 2002(?) back in the days when Bob was known as Tarp-man

    The cost of ready-dehydrated food is certainly eye-watering.

    Would that one that was linked to earlier, reduced to £26.99, be any cop? Diddy said to start off cheap but...would it cut the mustard?

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